Friday, April 14, 2017

Paris Churches

Good Friday - a day for churches in a city peppered with beautiful churches.

A view of the back of Notre Dame Cathedral from Île Saint-Louis

Today is really just a photo journal of the gorgeous churches I simply cannot pass by as I walk through Paris.

Trinity Church

The first church I was ever inside in Paris was the Trinity Church in the 9th. When My Husband was at his interview back when we were hoping to come to Paris, I did my bit by lighting candles and praying that things would work out for us. I think they did!

This is the closest Church to us - St Merry with it's beautiful doors...


It often hosts funky art exhibits.


 And we've been to a music/light show there also.
 
video

And I love how the sun caught this statue... A mother losing her son - quite poignant, not only on Good Friday.


A similar statue can be found in Eglise (that means church) Saint-Nicolas-des-Champs.


She looks so sad.

This was another church I stumbled upon while out shopping for groceries. Okay, while getting lost on my way to the grocery store... And of course, I had to go in.


The sunlight was so strong that it projected the stain glass patterns onto the other wall.


 But when it comes to stained glass, Sainte Chapelle wins the prize.


I've been here 3 times and counting - its on my MUST DO list for Paris.


It must have felt magical to stand and look at these windows and the bible stories on them way back in the 12th century - these people had limited access to art, books and of course no TV - so the impact must have been tremendous.



Another close-by church is St Eustace - we happened to wander in during auditions for a new organ player. The sound was amazing - made my skin goose bump and threw a surge of emotion at the back of my eye lids! Unfortunately, I didn't record it but I do have a pretty picture of its rose window.


On my recent walking tour with Corey Frye, we took in the Saint Sulpice church.

Saint Sulpice seen from Montparnasse Tower

So much to see in this church, like where the french Revolutionaries tried to eradicate all references to religion from the church and turn it into a temple of reason. Obviously, this stain glass window was too high up for them.


Those vaulted ceilings were obviously not so high that they couldn't be sculpted - or perhaps it was done on the ground then fitted together like a giant 3D jigsaw - either way, its pretty impressive!



And then there's the frescos that proved so difficult for the painter Delacroix that working on them killed him!

Delacroix was quite obsessed with violence and angels!


Then of course there's my favorite - The Notre Dame Cathedral. Coming from Armagh, I guess I have a thing about Cathedrals. Even though the towers look like spires that haven't been finished, I just love this cathedral (but not as much as the Armagh Cathedral)

Notre Dame Cathedral from Mountparnasse Tower
 Inside it is like a double-decker version of the Armagh Cathedral.


And photogenic day or night.


The Sacre Coeur is a very different style, but equally impressive on its perch over the city.




So many churches, so many prayers!

Mine is that we all have a peaceful and violence free Easter and that tolerance and love flow freely in your hearts, homes and countries.

Byddi Lee


Saturday, April 8, 2017

The Dos and Don'ts of Versaille

First off, this will not be an exhaustive list since I feel like I barely scratched the surface on a recent day trip to this fabulous Palace and estate, despite being there from 11am to 5pm!


So this is just a brief snapshot of a few tips that we picked up that day...


Do..

1 Take the train

From Paris the best way to travel to the town of Versailles is by train. Depending on where you are, you can take metro, RER and TER or a combination of these. We took the RER C from Pont Saint-Michel, a straight shot out, taking 40 minutes and only costing €3.55 one way. The train drops you a short ten minutes walk from the Palace - just follow the crowds.




2 Buy a return ticket 

Usually, we like to give ourselves the option of returning by Uber (a luxury that we have yet to treat ourselves to) but the queue the ticket machines in Versailles were horrendous! Tourists who didn't know how to work the vending machines coupled with very user unfriendly interfaces left a long wait for everyone. Not to mention that you could line up for one machine only to discover it only took coins, which of course you don't have enough of! So we regretted not buying a return ticket at Pont Saint-Michel.



3 Take all day for your trip

The grounds are huge! Really vast and I envision us taking many more trips to explore the gardens, the fountains, the Palaces of Trianon and Marie-Antoinette's Estate. The later two we didn't even reach!



4 Have lunch at La Petite Venise
 
We found there were plenty of places to eat, from snacks to sumptuous sit down meals. We stumbled upon La Petite Venise as we explored the grounds. We were hungry and it was a little after 1pm. The waiter told us there would be a table for us in half an hour. We decided to wait since we were with friends and we knew the time would go by quickly as we chatted in the lovely garden and sipped aperitifs - rosé for the gals, the guys opting for full blooded red.

The meal was delicious. I had rabbit and I'd really recommend it. The bill came to €100. Not bad for four main courses, one or two drinks each and nice nibbles while we'd waited.

The dining room in the King's apartments - not for the likes of us!


5 Do consider buying an annual pass 

If you live in Paris or plan to visit often, you can buy a pass for €50, or for €80 a pass that allows you to bring a guest. These passes pay for themselves after two trips and  they allow you to skip the queue, which when we were there was already 250 meters long (I measured it out using google Earth!) This is the line for gate A, but it mysteriously swings around in front of gate B, so we walked all the way up to the front of the line just to figure out where it went. 

We've found in France, if there are a bunch of you, put someone into the obvious line to reserve a place while the rest run around to the various other (usually not well signposted) entrances/gates to see if there is a better way in. 

You can also skip the line if you buy a guided tour but you must be with your guide...but more on that in the Donts!


 
6 Buy your tickets online

If you buy your tickets online you will be cutting out one more line and you can go straight into the gardens where the line is relatively small.



 Don't...

1 Don't go on the Kings apartments tour

There were thirty people on this tour which started at 3pm. The guide was dreary. She never modulated her voice and delivered her spiel as though she were thoroughly bored with it, with the result that it was boring. The rooms were lovely but she lingered too long on mundane details while skipping over things that seemed more interesting. I'd have liked to have heard more of the history, but this woman was obsessed with repeating the worlds, "Louis-the-fourteenth-the-sun-king" and "the-palace-of-versailles" over and over again (we'd have understood who she was referring to if she'd said "the king" and where she was talking about with "the palace")
 
Zzzzzzzz!

By the end of the two hour long tour, we were ready to go home. So we didn't get to see much more of the insides of the Palace. Though what we did see was stunning - the ceilings were amazing - better than what we saw in the King's apartments. This area was open to all.



Unfortunately, it is the only guided tour the official website seems to offer in English. I will be going back and researching other tours and will write a blog post about that when I do.




2 Don't try to see it all in one day

The place is so big, I can't imagine how it is even possible to see it all in one day. If you know you'll only ever be here once have a list of priorities - decide what you want to see the most and go do that part first. The official website has an interactive map which you can use to figure out your strategy.


3 Don't bring long umbrellas, large bags/suitcases/rucksacks, camera tripods, selfie sticks

There is a bag deposit for these things on site but that involves another line! If you don't need to bring it - don't bring it (walking sticks are on the list too so I don't know what you are supposed to do when you check that in!) Evidently this guy wasn't required to check in his huge club!



4 Don't rush

Relax and enjoy the palace, the gardens, the fountains... especially if you're only here once - don't spoil your visit by getting stressed out.




5 Don't take any notice of the crowds

Crowds will happen, and there is nothing you can do about it. It may be possible to find a little knook by a fountain to pop the question or you can be like the guys we saw proposing to his girlfriend at Latona's Fountain, in full view of the world and ... it's wife! She said. "Yes!" We were all relieved.


 6 Don't buy the cheapest day ticket or the most expensive!

Unless you know that exactly what you want to see and no more - read carefully through the ticket options to be sure they include the gardens, fountain shows, temporary exhibitions and the Trianon estate if  you want the options of going there. 


We bought a one day passport that included 


We did not get to see the estate of Trianon, any temporary exhibitions (that I'm aware of) the Musical Fountain Show or the Coach Gallery. There was the usual confusion (through not enough signposting and not knowing enough French - oh and it's France - so any sign posts that are there are not consistent!) regarding where to go, where to line up, where to get the audioguides (if they were even provided in English) so plenty for us to return to see and suss out and blog about so you can have a smoother experience. Maybe I'll get myself a posh desk to write it on too!

Byddi Lee
 

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Springtime In Paris

I can't decide if it is cliche or a meme, but springtime in Paris is most definitely a thang! For the first time since we arrived, I've been able to wander around outside without my coat on. Obviously, I didn't think it was as warm as this gal did!


We first arrived in October, plunging from hot Californian temperatures in the 30's (Celsius) to the brrrrr of 10C, with rain and wind, in Paris. The sky went from permanently cobalt to a kaleidoscope of  grey, white, and blue. And then it got colder still, such that the temperature took on a personality of its own, like having having someone unpleasant around who you just had to rub along with anyway.

This week that unpleasant person left the building - or the city - to be exact!

On Sunday, we decided to explore Le Promenade Planée, a walk along an old railway line that ran from the Bastille to Vincennes. I've also heard it called "la Coulée verte" and I'm not sure which is correct. Either way - It's been landscaped as a park, and I'd been dying to check it since I came across it on a blog called "Cool Stuff in Paris." I mean, if ya'd just moved to Paris sure ye'd be mad not to read a blog with a name like that, wouldn't you? It's directions were spot on and we didn't even get lost!

We took the metro to the Bastille and exited onto Rue de Lyon. I had a chuckle at this place.


You see, the Bastille is a place where many protests and demonstrations or manifestations take place. How handy is it pick up your placard just 100 meters from the Bastille? It says something about a place that the postal service is complicated and confusing, the rail service a complete mystery, but if you want to protest, you've practically got a convenient one stop shop!

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Okay - I gotta interrupt myself here to set the record straight - I was at my French lesson the day after I posted this blog post and we were having a conversation about the imperative tense, and I said something along the line of, "Oh yeah, don't you use that on advertisements and placards and such?"

"Oui," she said and then told me the French word for  advertisement which I repeated. Then she said,"But the word placard in French does not mean placard."

Oh oh - I felt my tummy drop! "So what does it mean?"

"It means cupboard in English."

Noooooooooooooooo! I had to confess to her about this post (well just the section above) and she had a good laugh.

"Can you imagine taking a placard to a manifestation?"  I said.

"If you got a big enough one you could hide in it, if there was any trouble!" she added.




"But really," my teacher said, "any French people reading your blog..." She stopped and wrote out a phrase in my notes - ils vont être morts de rire - they are going to die laughing!

By this stage I was laughing too - well, where would I be if I couldn't laugh at myself? I'm okay with being laughed at ...when I deserve it!

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Before too long we saw what we were looking for.


We climbed up the steps and absorbed the beauty of nature as it blossomed around us.


Some late bloomers  were poised right on the edge...


And this yellow blossom seemed to trap the very sunlight itself (as a biologist I must point out, that mostly, only the green parts of plants actually really capture the light!)


There was even water fountains along the way.


And daffodils - all different varieties - but these were my favorite.


We walked high about other streets, and I loved how this one had all its trees in full bloom.


The afternoon sun made it a challenge to get these pictures but did produce some interesting lighting effects, I think.


I fought the temptation to show a gazillion more flowers from this walk, preferring instead to add to this post photos that I took later in the week as I walked home from my french lesson in the 13th arrondisment, (South Paris). It has been a glorious week weather wise. So yep, less cleaning more street art had a certain ring to it!


I love this picture of the old lady walking through archways of flowers.


And oh my, the smell of the clematis. Hmmmmm! And the birdsong - pure audible joy!


More street art - brightening up the rainy days when they do come.


I loved how on one side of the street, there was an old chateau, centuries old.


 And this directly across the road!


I was just thinking about how in years to come, would people be taking pictures of this quaint old building. Would modern art - when less modern - be as attractive to the people of the future as the old chateau is to me now?

That very same sentiment is echoed in a fellow bloggers post a French Frye in Paris. Have a look at how he saw Paris this week (and other weeks - I highly recommend this blog) The photos are absolutely gorgeous. And if you're in Paris, his tours are amazing. I've been on one and it was a fascinating insight into the city. I certainly planning on attending more!

I hope Spring has sprung just as beautifully for the rest of my fellow northern hemispherers!

Byddi Lee